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seminolewar


Davis, Oklahoma

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This small town in Oklahoma seems to be the gateway to the Arbuckle Mountains. I stopped by the small historical museum. As usual for small towns, the historical museum was in the former train depot. And when the freight train rolls by, hold onto the exhibits!

Small town museums can sometimes be very interesting. And this one has a few surprises for me.

Near the entrance way, you are greeted by Richmond Kimble, a Buffalo Soldier from the 10th Cav.



Push the red button, and he will greet you. He was stationed at nearby Fort Arbuckle, and is buried not far away on private property. They are not sure if his name was Richmond or Richard. If it's Richard, that's the same name as my Kimball/Kimble ancestor who came to this continent in 1634. I wonder if there is a connection?

At one time there was a historical marker for Ft. Arbuckle, but it disappeared when the road widened, and nobody has found or replaced it.

The museum has the usual local fare from fort artifacts to high school and church photographs. Here are a few of the odd and unusual things:

Below is the tool box from Hutchins Furniture and Undertakes, made like a minature casket!



And I found this unusual metal boundary marker post:



The note card taped onto it says, "One of the markers placed among the boundary separating the Creek Indian Nation and the Cherokee Indian Nation. This one belongs to Jim Saylor, of Davis. He found it on land he owned near Eufaula, OK."

Fortunately this land Boomer / Sooner, Jim Saylor, preserved it for us here. I have never seen a marker like this before.
Current Location:
Davis, Oklahoma
Current Mood:
awake awake
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On November 24th, 2010 08:06 am (UTC), (Anonymous) commented:
Marker
Hey there, I think this is a marker that was taken from our land by James Saylor (Jim). James is a relative, but did not own the land. The owners, Erma Lee and Warren G. Saylor both lived in California at the time and he simply took it upon himself to "donate" this peice of our family history. Erma Lee is my great-aunt and is still living. Warren G. Saylor was a grandfather and is deceased. Could you please give me some contact information on this museum. We have had this land in our family for almost a hundred years. We love it and will keep and protect it best we can so long as we can. We would want to put the marker back. Our property is called often Standing Rock Mountain b/c it was a mountain next to Canadian river where the famous Standing Rock stood b/f the river was flooded to make Lake Eufaula. It is the southern-most allotment of the Cherokee Nation.
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On November 24th, 2010 10:58 am (UTC), seminolewar replied:
Re: Marker
It is in the Arbuckle Historical Museum in the old train depot; here is a web page: http://www.davisok.org/Museums.asp

The note card taped onto it says, "One of the markers placed among the boundary separating the Creek Indian Nation and the Cherokee Indian Nation. This one belongs to Jim Saylor, of Davis. He found it on land he owned near Eufaula, OK."

I showed it to a contact who works in the bureau of survey & mapping in Tallahassee, and he has never seen a marker like that before. He said you can't miss that one!

Sometimes you wonder how these end up in small museums miles from where they were, so your explanation could be right.
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On November 24th, 2010 11:02 am (UTC), seminolewar commented:
marker
If by chance you do get it back, I would recommend that it stays protected by the weather since it is showing some rust. I would consider it a unique historical artifact.
On November 26th, 2010 11:29 pm (UTC), (Anonymous) replied:
Re: marker
Thank you so much for the additional information. I spoke with my mother about it and she came to the same conclusion as you- that it would need to be protected from the elements and/or vandalism. We are thinking that we will speak to the Cherokee Nation and determine if they would want to assist in it being transferred to the tribes Cultural Center or other appropriate location; our land was the most southern Cherokee allotment (I think).

Thanks, Ella
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