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September in Seminole War History

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Sorry, but I was way behind on this. Here are the historical events for September.


1 September 1836 - 759 Creeks are recruited by the United States Army to become Indian scouts and mediators against the Seminoles in Florida.


2 September 1841 - Three citizens are killed at Martin’s Point between Micanopy and Wacahoota.


6 September 1840 - Seminoles attack near Fort Wacahoota; two soldiers killed.


9 September 1812 - Seminoles and their Black allies boldly attack and destroy the storehouses at the American outpost at Picolata on the St. Johns River, despite the presence of 250 Georgia Volunteer soldiers.


9 September 1837 - Army troops surprise and overrun a Seminole encampment near the Tomoka River. King Philip is captured.


10 September 1837 - Battle of Mosquito Inlet. Army troops surround and capture Yuchie (or Uchee) Billy and his camp. 2nd Lt. John Winfield Scott McNeil is killed, nephew of future President Franklin Pierce.


10 September 1839 - Indians attack a military escort near Fort Fanning.


12 September 1812 - A supply train traveling between the American encampment at St. Augustine to Fort Stallings (on Davis Creek, Duval County) is attacked by a large number of Black Seminoles and Seminole Indians in the Twelvemile Swamp. Captain Williams, commanding the supply train, is badly wounded and dies two weeks later.


15 September 1814 – British forces fail to capture Fort Bowyer at Mobile Bay from the Americans. The British land force includes 180 Seminole or Miccosukee Indians from Florida. The British had failed to take the fort because John Innerarity of John Forbes & Co. had warned the Americans in advance. The retreating British and their Indian allies loot the Forbes store at Bon Secour in retaliation.


16 September 1818 - Soldiers pursue and battle warriors under Savannah Jack over a large area in Butler County of southern Alabama.


18 September 1823 - Governor DuVal negotiates the Treaty of Moultrie Creek with the Florida Indians. Neamathla is picked to lead the Seminole delegation. The minutes of the treaty negotiations are incomplete, with whole days unrecorded. It is not known what happened at the actual negotiations and how the treaty articles came about.
The Indians agree to stay in central Florida under provisions of the treaty. The government agrees to protect them as long as they obey the law, and agrees to give them livestock, food, and annuity payments of $5000 for 20 years. The government also agrees to keep unauthorized whites off the reservation and maintain an agent on the reservation. The Indians agree not to encourage former slaves to fight against the U.S. There is no provision on how long the treaty was to be in effect; later the Seminoles claim that it had to be at least 20 years, because that is how long the annuity payments were to be paid. Unfortunately the government totally fails to provide the food provisions, with either no food or rancid beef.
The Indian Agency under Gad Humphreys moves to a location near the present city of Ocala in 1825. Fort King is established near the agency in 1827. Fort Brooke at Tampa Bay is established in 1824.
Under the treaty, Neamathla is given a small area of land to settle in the Apalachicola Valley. He later loses it because of his hostility towards the United States and dissatisfaction over failure of the government to carry out provisions in the treaty. In 1826 he moves to Alabama. In 1836 at the age of 84, he participates in the Creek War in Georgia and Alabama as one of the most successful war chiefs.
Governor Duval, Commissioner James Gadsden, and Secretary of War John Calhoun in correspondence suggest that the Seminoles should be sent west of the Mississippi.


18 September 1836 - The Battle at San Felasco Hammock. 100 Florida volunteers and regular army troops drive back a large Seminole force.


18 September 1837 - The last of the U.S. Army Creek Indian Scouts are released from service in Florida. Many are ill and dissatisfied with the treatment they received. Their families are sent west after waiting for removal at Fort Morgan, Alabama.


20 September 1565 - The Spanish overrun Fort Caroline and rename it Fort San Mateo.


20 September 1852 - After meeting with President Fillmore in Washington, Billy Bowlegs signs a treaty with three other Florida Seminole delegates whom agree to emigrate west. The Indians change their mind after harsh treatment from the whites and hearing about living conditions from their relatives out west.


24 September 1812 - Colonel Daniel Newnan with 117 Georgia Volunteers start a 3-week rampage through Florida. His objective is a lightning attack against King Payne and the Seminole town of Lotchaway at Alachua prairie.


25 September 1841 - Skirmish near Fort Russell. Indians attack an Army escort with supply wagons camped for the night.


27 September 1812 - Colonel Newnan’s force runs into King Payne and about 75 Seminole warriors. A fierce battle lasts into the night with neither side getting the advantage. The Georgia force builds a breastwork for defense, but it also cages them in and cuts off any escape route. King Payne, now over 80 years old, bravely leads the Seminoles, but is wounded and dies a few months later.


27 September 1839 - Skirmish near Fort Lauderdale.


30 September 1836 - Skirmish near Tampa Bay.
Current Location:
the hammock
Current Mood:
crazy crazy
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